Design is both the insanely radical and the passionately incremental

Posted by on Feb 21, 2014 | 0 comments

I’ve always had a big interest in design. When something is well designed, it’s half of the work done. People just get it. Let me explain. Sometimes design is about making something that’s never been seen before. It’s like Steve Jobs said — you can’t ask people what they want, you need to design it and show it to them. The result can sometimes be a quantum leap, an epiphany that comes to life as an object or experience nobody in their right mind could have imagined before. Great designers can stretch us towards the limits of our...

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The Need For Speed Is Killing Your Company

Posted by on Feb 4, 2014 | 0 comments

There is a great misconception among leaders today; too often, and especially when feeling the pressure, leaders assume it is their job to narrow a decision to a simple pair of choices–yes/no, stop/start, either/or. This is scarcity mentality in action. Wait, what? Only if it’s a BAD leader. Good leaders don’t think like this. For instance, when we go too fast–consistently and instinctively–we erode our ability to learn, to embrace other perspectives, to reflect and consider the consequences of actions, and to...

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Dialing back the cleverness

Posted by on Sep 24, 2013 | 0 comments

There is no way to better state this…. Debugging is twice as hard as writing the code in the first place. Therefore, if you write the code as cleverly as possible, you are, by definition, not smart enough to debug it. By writing very complex code, you’ll approach your ”cleverness level”, and be unable to move forward, much less get anyone else to take it ownership. I take pride in what I call “readable even after an all-nighter code”, which, as the name implies, can be understood even when you’ve...

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It’s not only about the games

Posted by on Sep 20, 2013 | 0 comments

Interesting article on the views of 2 experienced venture capitalists, and what they look for when they invest in game startups. TL;DR: The following list can be applied to any industry. 1. Hyatt’s number one metric for games that interest him as investment prospects: Day-one retention, i.e. whether new users come back the next day to play. If people don’t use your app, product or service often, you’ll never get marketshare. 2. What’s the aspiration of a player? Why are your clients willing to use your service? Why would they...

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When no one else is passionate about your passion

Posted by on Sep 20, 2013 | 0 comments

Unfortunately, not all who chase their passions will find a perfectly overlapping market need. There’s a tension brewing in the startup world that I think needs to be brought to light. Most founders who take the time to blog or write will at some point share the following advice, “You must follow your passion. Startups are so hard that if you’re not passionate about your mission, there’s no way you’ll succeed.” At the same time, the lean startup movement has entrepreneurs everywhere “building, measuring and learning” what the market wants,...

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Expose Yourself to New Things

Posted by on Sep 18, 2013 | 0 comments

I was asked last week, in a Fashion and Tech meetup, why I was there. My answer? “To see things outside of my domain”. I truly didn’t have a reason, except to see whether I would be able to come up with new ideas. Today I found this article to back my intuition up.. So if you want to generate more innovative ideas, then you should purposely expose your mind to radically different facts and unusual, often conflicting concepts. Creative ideas are high in “information entropy,” because they are not predictable. They don’t...

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l faut laisser le ‘comment’ à ceux qui font

Posted by on Sep 18, 2013 | 0 comments

When people are encouraged to make decisions and take quick action, this will lead to increased efficiency, innovation, and stuff getting done. Here’s an interesting story about a French company that only cares about doing what is needed for the customer to be satisfied. Accountability is to the customer and to the team, not a boss — people are free to experiment, innovate, and solve problems for customers. They’re known for working off-shift to serve customers or to test out new procedures. Equipment, tooling, workspace,...

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Independent Innovators

Posted by on Sep 16, 2013 | 0 comments

Innovation will often come from those who are willing to think outside the box… this includes breaking the mold within their organizations. Mavericks are the independent innovators or performers–often quirky–who do not run well with others. They think and act differently. Many mavericks take mischievous delight in shaking things up. The truth of the matter is that mavericks don’t always get along well with others. They are often strong willed, a bit quirky, and with different standards which will lead to...

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Emotions and Decision Making

Posted by on Sep 15, 2013 | 0 comments

Rational analysis is very important. However, when your rationality is flawed from an overly-emotional bias, you might get yourself in trouble. Emotions are woven into all decision-making processes in many ways in which we are not conscious. Leaders who see themselves as making decisions in a purely rational manner could be setting themselves–and their organizations–up for potential disaster because they may end up believing that they are right when they are wrong. However, you can gain control over some of these emotions by...

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Saying “yes” a bit too much

Posted by on Sep 14, 2013 | 0 comments

I have a serious problem with saying “no”, specially when it’s something that I think might impact the world in a big manner. Over time this had led to an unhealthy lifestyle, with way too many all-nighters, and not enough family time. On my defense, “yes” to a lot of things does encourage innovation. It’s equally as important to learn how to say “no” in order to keep teams focused, functional, and productive. Saying “yes” isn’t always a luxury that you can afford, and finding that...

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